Posts Tagged ‘teamwork

11
Jul
17

accra, 11 july

Busy but productive times here at the University of Ghana.

 

Attending talks. Here, insights into the disastrous effect of jihadi occupation on the heritage and tourist industry in Timbuktu, and in Mali more generally. Malian colleagues outlined the work done to investigate, study and repair the mosque and mausolea torn down in 2012.

20170711_085741_resized

Catching up with friends and colleagues; trading books, cowries and pots.

 

 

And still scouring the storerooms for shells!

20170709_151258_resized

 

Advertisements
17
Feb
17

goodbye, kinolhas

On our last evening on the island, we were given a wonderful farewell.

20170216_200351

The coolest cowrie-themed cake ever-complete with anatomically correct yellow ring around the dorsum!

A barbecue with fresh fish caught by Moamin.

20170216_200309

16
Feb
17

days 29, 30

Work continues… on our long-standing Trench 631 but also on two new, smaller, trenches at the periphery of the site.

There has been a lot of wind lately and the sea has been rougher. The latter has no direct impact on our work but the former makes things a bit trickier: papers fly away, line levels flutter in the wind, leaves blow into pristine trenches just ready to be photographed.

20170213_122814.jpg

Afternoons merrily engaged gluing pots, sorting bone, piecing together gravestones…

Just three days left to go, so as well as wrapping up the digging we have to make sure all our finds are inventoried and packed up and, wherever possible, the non-essentials left behind (to save on hefty airline excess baggage fees).

20170214_122238.jpg

03
Feb
17

day 18, kinolhas

Yesterday we stayed late finishing up the cleaning and photographing of David’s trench T321.

This was the trench with a lot of stones, some possibly aligned – and now we have hit a series of circular patches of dark sand which might just be postholes.Which would be fantastic, giving a sense of the houses people built. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

20170202_172829

Shiura’s trench T325 has reached its end, so on Saturday we will be starting a new one. Her new one, T544, up to recently heavily forested, is difficult to recognise now.

20170202_170227

Annalisa went cowrie fishing with some young ladies.

20170202_101224.jpg

And as usual there was plent of pot processing.

02
Feb
17

it’s the week-end!

20170202_183902.jpg

22
Jan
17

day 7, arriving

We will now be based in Kinolhas (Dhivehi: ކިނޮޅަސް). One of its claims to fame is that ibn Battuta first landed here when he arrived in the Maldives. He writes:

When I reached there I disembarked at the island of Kannalus [Kinolhas island in Raa atoll], a beautiful island in which there are numerous mosques. I put up at the house of one of its pious inhabitants where I was received hospitably by the jurist Ali. He was an accomplished man and had sons who pursued the study of sciences. There I met a man named Muhammad, a native of Dhofar (Zafar-ul-humuz), who entertained me and told me, ‘When you enter the island Mahal [Male’], the vezir will detain you, for the people there have no judge.’

A spot of impromptu survey – trying to link the putative medieval settlement with the reported medieval harbour. It is not all fine sandy beaches in the Maldives…

But there are some of these too, of course.

20170122_172216

20170122_173124.jpg

Meeting our team. We will hopefully work together for 22 days and do good research.

Kinolhas is about 0.5 km2 in size and has 580 inhabitants but a third live in Male’ in search for better education and job opportunities.

18
Jan
17

travelling

20170117_183523.jpg20170117_184930.jpg20170117_171709.jpg




About this blog

This blog has been set up to chart the activities and research findings of two projects led by Anne Haour, an archaeologist from the Sainsbury Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom.

The first project, called Crossroads, brings together a team of archaeologists, historians and anthropologists studying the Niger Valley where it borders Niger and Bénin (West Africa). We are hoping to shed more light on the people that inhabited the area in the past 1500 years and to understand how population movements and craft techniques shaped the area's past.

The second project, called Cowries, examines the money cowrie, a shell which served as currency, ritual object and ornament across the world for millennia, and in medieval times most especially in the Maldive Islands of the Indian Ocean and the Sahelian regions of West Africa. We hope to understand how this shell was sourced and used in those two areas.

These investigations are funded by the European Research Council as part of the Starting Independent Researcher Programme (Seventh Framework Programme – FP7) and by the Leverhulme Trust as a Research Project Grant. The opinions posted here are however Anne Haour's own!

Please log in often, comment and/or subscribe to keep up to date with what's happening.

Blog Stats

  • 29,813 hits

Recent posts

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. There will be a special prize for the 50th subscriber

Join 148 other followers

Calendar

October 2017
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031