Posts Tagged ‘post-excavation

25
May
17

norwich, 25 may

Back in Norwich where temperatures are just slightly below those of Dakar, and spending a week sorting, filing and tidying the Crossroads finds and data.

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This has also been the occasion to go through the various image folders and come up with some gems from the past.

Filming some podcasts – which you can now hear here.

Steering meeting – work and play:

Back in Benin:

A very cute pot – thanks to Giulia N for the photo.

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Also, back to work also on the project book, which we hope to have out next year.

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16
Feb
17

days 29, 30

Work continues… on our long-standing Trench 631 but also on two new, smaller, trenches at the periphery of the site.

There has been a lot of wind lately and the sea has been rougher. The latter has no direct impact on our work but the former makes things a bit trickier: papers fly away, line levels flutter in the wind, leaves blow into pristine trenches just ready to be photographed.

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Afternoons merrily engaged gluing pots, sorting bone, piecing together gravestones…

Just three days left to go, so as well as wrapping up the digging we have to make sure all our finds are inventoried and packed up and, wherever possible, the non-essentials left behind (to save on hefty airline excess baggage fees).

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12
Feb
17

day 28, kinolhas

A busy morning digging… but also backfilling, as we are nearing the end of the season.

There is a family from Kerala living on the island, and we take the opportunity of their walking past our pot-processing area to show them some of our material. Judging by its decoration, the tamper marks on the inner surface of the sherds, and comparable material from other published sites, some of our stuff appears to be from southern India and perhaps Kerala specifically. So we asked them if it looked familiar.

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Ramla brings lunch onto site and we have a picnic.

Drone’s eye view of our site: Trench 631 bottom left.

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09
Feb
17

day 25

Another busy day to close off the week.

An experimental flight of the drone lent to us gives us a new view of our area of investigation.

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Trench 325 is the white square near top right of the image – it is 2×2 m in size. Smaller white blotches (e.g. the three running in a diagonal line) are our shovel test pits.

A team of five has been occupied finding, and marking with stakes, all the stone structures in the area. Next week we will take their GPS points and fill out survey sheets.

Still working on Trench 631. Annalisa completes the huge job that was planning the stone structures.

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I do an honest morning’s digging, which is good for the soul.

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Whizzing through washing of pots, pottery desampling and sampling (ie. recording and eliminating those which are too small or are undecorated), and measuring shell.

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26
Jan
17

day 11, kinolhas

Finds processing at the island Council office – and the view from there: not bad!

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Once we had washed the pots, we laid them out in a grid that replicates our grid of shovel test pits across the western end of the island. This made any particular concentrations of material jump out.

We will know even more once we have analysed the pots, shell and bone, but this gives us a useful overview.

Shiura and David claim their excavation units, to start on Saturday…

31
Aug
14

recent activities, en images

Looking back on the summer, now drawing to a close; we have not been idle..-

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CT scanning of artefacts at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

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Post-conference excursion to the Apartheid Museum

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Second batch of professional photography of small finds – here rather recent ones (dye bottles, for example)

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Determined to tackle this pottery backlog on my desk

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A pot from Birnin Lafiya SX

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Research trip to the Archives Nationales d’Outre-Mer

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Excavation of the cylindrical vessel we fondly call ‘torpedo pot’

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Professional refitting in progress of one of our pavements… this is what it looked like in situ (5 Feb 2012).




About this blog

This blog has been set up to chart the activities and research findings of two projects led by Anne Haour, an archaeologist from the Sainsbury Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom.

The first project, called Crossroads, brings together a team of archaeologists, historians and anthropologists studying the Niger Valley where it borders Niger and Bénin (West Africa). We are hoping to shed more light on the people that inhabited the area in the past 1500 years and to understand how population movements and craft techniques shaped the area's past.

The second project, called Cowries, examines the money cowrie, a shell which served as currency, ritual object and ornament across the world for millennia, and in medieval times most especially in the Maldive Islands of the Indian Ocean and the Sahelian regions of West Africa. We hope to understand how this shell was sourced and used in those two areas.

These investigations are funded by the European Research Council as part of the Starting Independent Researcher Programme (Seventh Framework Programme – FP7) and by the Leverhulme Trust as a Research Project Grant. The opinions posted here are however Anne Haour's own!

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