Posts Tagged ‘africa

13
Apr
17

bahrain, 13 april

I am in Bahrain for the Islamic Archaeology in Global Perspective conference.

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We have been hearing papers outlining the nature of the Islamic occupations from Brunei to Morocco via Turkmenistan, Yemen, Saudi and many others. In some areas such as the Levant, these rather late, medieval, levels were dug straight through to get to the older, Classical or Biblical-era, levels that were of more interest to the excavators. I will be talking about West Africa later today; there the problem has sometimes been the opposite, where sites were excavated down to Islamic levels – enough to try and show that a site mentioned in Arabic written records had been identified – and no further. Neither approach is considered acceptable today, by the way!

 

 

07
Nov
16

spotlight on crossroads… and uk at a crossroads

The University of East Anglia (UEA) puts the spotlight on our recent work in Benin: read about it here.

UEA is in the top 15 institutions for research impact in the UK and ranked 63rd worldwide for research citations. Much of this is a product of international collaborations such as Crossroads. … and we in UK Higher Education are really worried at present. There are 32,000 non-British EU academics in UK university teaching and research posts, accounting for 17% of the total. UEA Vice-Chancellor notes, “UEA was founded with an international outlook. It’s in our DNA, it’s at the heart of our interdisciplinary and collaborative approach to research. We have always welcomed students and staff from around the world and we always will”.

 

 

30
Sep
16

The globalised world of the Middle Ages

Last few days before my public inaugural lecture. have spent today sourcing images of ibn Battuta, Aethelred pennies and the the shells from Border Cave. It will be quite a tour!

For those of you not in Norwich, you will be able to follow the lecture here.

28
Jul
15

brussels july 2015

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My main project in the next months, and for which I am on research leave, is to bring together the Crossroads monograph which will present some of the results of our five-year research in Benin. There are 30 contributors to this volume and it will contain a whole range of types of information, so it is quite a complicated endeavour.  Ali LS, Olivier G and I spent four days earlier this month moving the process forward. We were surrounded by the amazing collection of ethnographic pots which they have accumulated over the years (you can see some of them looming on the top shelf).

For variety I’m also spending time thinking about shells, cowrie shells specifically, for my new project which will take me into the Indian Ocean. I’ll be writing about this too on this blog as the project develops (see here for a brief note of its launch).

01
May
15

new video

Visit the Crossroads exhibition archive to hear Benin archaeologist Didier N’Dah describe the aims and results of the project in northern Benin. This interview was made in March during our latest field trip for the project.

12
Mar
15

cotonou, 6-8 march

The end of project workshop went very well, with some 15 papers.

The opening, attended by Université Abomey Calavi’s vice-chancellor, the faculty dean, the head of the archaeology lab and the head of the department of history and archaeology, involved two presentations and a musical interlude.

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Papers followed all through the Saturday and, on the Sunday, a round table on heritage.

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Here is some local press coverage.

Refreshments were taken in the delightful setting of the Botanical Gardens of Université Abomey Calavi.

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On dit à tout le monde à la prochaine fois.

20
Feb
15

fieldwork – 2

Here is the document which we have designed to hand out to the various local communities amongst whom we have worked for the past 4 years in Dendi. We are really happy with it – we think it gives a good idea of what we have been up to and what we have been able to understand of the region. Hopefully others will agree!

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About this blog

This blog has been set up to chart the activities and research findings of two projects led by Anne Haour, an archaeologist from the Sainsbury Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom.

The first project, called Crossroads, brings together a team of archaeologists, historians and anthropologists studying the Niger Valley where it borders Niger and Bénin (West Africa). We are hoping to shed more light on the people that inhabited the area in the past 1500 years and to understand how population movements and craft techniques shaped the area's past.

The second project, called Cowries, examines the money cowrie, a shell which served as currency, ritual object and ornament across the world for millennia, and in medieval times most especially in the Maldive Islands of the Indian Ocean and the Sahelian regions of West Africa. We hope to understand how this shell was sourced and used in those two areas.

These investigations are funded by the European Research Council as part of the Starting Independent Researcher Programme (Seventh Framework Programme – FP7) and by the Leverhulme Trust as a Research Project Grant. The opinions posted here are however Anne Haour's own!

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