26
May
17

more worrying news for UK research

The Royal Society reports on disciplines most dependent on EU funding. This is a new report commissioned by the UK’s four national academies (which include the British Academy: see my earlier post here). It has analysed the latest available figures (2014-2015) available from the Higher Education Statistics Authority.

It confirms what we all knew, but it is actually worse than I had realised. Natural and physical sciences and engineering dominate in absolute numbers; clinical medicine, for example, received £120 million in 2014-2015. The Royal Society remarks with typical restraint that “Given the high numbers, [such] fields may find it challenging to replace this income from other sources if the UK no longer had access to EU funds”.

Last year twenty colleagues and I wrote to Theresa May to raise some of these concerns. Never got a reply beyond a short email from her office saying they are considering the matter. I am sure they have plenty more fish to fry, of course. Various sectors will be pleading for a slice of income now that the EU source is looking like it will be turned off.

Back to the report. 68 pages long, it gives a wealth of detail about the differences across sectors and disciplines in reliance on European funding. Archaeology is particularly exposed: 38% of its research funding comes from EU government bodies. In fact archaeology warrants a box feature (page 39) discussing this. “This increasing dependency on EU funding can be in part explained by the availability of and success of UK-based archaeologists in winning competitive ERC funding, which was launched in 2007 under FP7. ERC grants are unique to the discipline because of the size of the grants (enabling sufficient funding for the salary of academics working at different career stages), the length of the grants, and the collaborative nature of the funding. The ERC grants enable collaboration and teamwork that helps advance research. For Archaeology, there are no other sources of multiannual funding of this magnitude available.”

“[The EU’s] Horizon 2020 in turn is unique, and is the only international research and innovation programme of scale anywhere in the world. Other international research programmes are orders of magnitude smaller and often more narrowly based geographically and/or thematically”. I wrote something about this a few years back. And here.  And here and here for some votes of thanks to the EU.

‘Challenging’ doesn’t begin to cover it. I might use a stronger word…

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About this blog

This blog has been set up to chart the activities and research findings of two projects led by Anne Haour, an archaeologist from the Sainsbury Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom.

The first project, called Crossroads, brings together a team of archaeologists, historians and anthropologists studying the Niger Valley where it borders Niger and Bénin (West Africa). We are hoping to shed more light on the people that inhabited the area in the past 1500 years and to understand how population movements and craft techniques shaped the area's past.

The second project, called Cowries, examines the money cowrie, a shell which served as currency, ritual object and ornament across the world for millennia, and in medieval times most especially in the Maldive Islands of the Indian Ocean and the Sahelian regions of West Africa. We hope to understand how this shell was sourced and used in those two areas.

These investigations are funded by the European Research Council as part of the Starting Independent Researcher Programme (Seventh Framework Programme – FP7) and by the Leverhulme Trust as a Research Project Grant. The opinions posted here are however Anne Haour's own!

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